Trying out different development environments for Scala – Sublime Text 3 + REPL in iTerm

I am still unsure about the right development environment for my Scala developments.

At work it’s the very latest version of IntelliJ IDEA 13 with the Scala plugin (Windows 7) while at home I’m trying out other setups (Mac OS X). IDEA’s too much at times. I can’t seem to get fully up to speed with Sublime Text 3 either, perhaps because I’m not fully convinced it’s going to be my only development environment any time soon. People are using it with a great success, but the same may be said about Emacs or even Scala IDE.

Emacs is what many call the most powerful IDE, almost an operating system, but that is exactly what scares me a lot. Scala itself consumes a lot of my time, and with Emacs I’d have it less (or more when I’d learn it?). Let’s stick with something simpler. If however I could find a well written step-by-step document on how to get up to speed with Emacs and Scala, I might give it a try. Anyone?

Scala IDE is the IDE used by the author of the Scala language – Martin Odersky – while he’s teaching the courses on Coursera. It seems a de facto reference IDE for Scala development, but it’s Eclipse under the covers and I lost interest in using it (after I left IBM). I’m certainly sold to IDEA when picking up a full-blown IDE (I know nothing about the Scala support in NetBeans IDE).

With these mixed feelings I’m with Sublime Text 3 and sbt (console).

doing-exercises-fp-in-scala-sublime-repl

It’s however not a very productive environment for Scala newbies – no intellisense for Scala in Sublime Text gives very hard lessons. While there’s the excellent continuous relaunching a command, say test, with tilde (~), I haven’t yet learnt to have them upfront and often end up with just a bunch of Scala files that I load to REPL with :load completely overcoming SBT features that would help me upon saving.

What’s your development environment for Scala? I’d appreciate comments so they could help me find it and eventually focus on Scala rather than looking around for an development environment.

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